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Tropical Storm Gonzalo Forms East of Leeward Islands; Watches Issued In Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico (FORECAST)

Tropical Storm Fay Hits Bermuda

Tropical Storm Gonzalo, the seventh named storm of the 2014 Atlantic hurricane season, has formed about 200 miles east of the Leeward Islands.

The Weather Channel TV network will pre-empt regular programming nationwide to bring you continuing live weather coverage from midnight Sunday night (Monday morning) until at least 11 p.m. EDT Monday to cover Tropical Storm Gonzalo, along with the severe weather outbreak in the Midwest and South. We will cut into programming at other times if conditions warrant.

(MORE: Expert Analysis | Hurricane Central)

Gonzalo is moving toward the west at 10-15 mph, and is expected to steadily gain strength over the next few days.

Tropical storm warnings have posted for the northern Leeward Islands, and tropical storm watches have been hoisted for the Virgin Islands, Culebra, Vieques, and Puerto Rico.

Gonzalo will spread showers with gusts of tropical storm force across the Leeward Islands through Monday, then into the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico later Monday into Tuesday.

(FORECASTS: San Juan | St. Thomas | St. Croix)

Gonzalo may near hurricane strength by time it reaches Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

Gonzalo is then expected to curl toward the northwest, then north around the periphery of subtropical high pressure in the central Atlantic Ocean.

A later such turn may place parts of the southeast Bahamas and Hispanola in a risk of more significant impact by mid-week. Gonzalo is expected to be a hurricane by the time it begins its northwest curl.

It is not clear yet whether future Gonzalo will threaten Bermuda next weekend. All interests from the Leeward Islands to Hispanola, the southeast Bahamas and Bermuda should monitor closely the progress of this system.

(MORE: Tropical Storm Fay Hammers Bermuda)

At this time, this system poses no threat to the mainland United States.

Below are the latest status maps, forecast maps, watch/warning maps, and satellite imagery.

Background

Projected Path

Projected Path

Projected Path

The latest forecast path and wind speeds from the National Hurricane Center.

 

Background

Storm Information

Storm Information

Current Information

So, where exactly is the cyclone’s center located now? If you’re plotting the storm along with us, the information depicted in the map above provides the latitude/longitude coordinates, distance away from the nearest land location, maximum sustained winds and central pressure (measured in millibars).

 

Background

Tropical Storm Watches/Warnings

Tropical Storm Watches/Warnings

Tropical Storm/Hurricane Watches/Warnings

A tropical storm or hurricane watch is issued when those conditions are possible within the area. Watches are typically posted 48 hours in advance of the onset of tropical storm-force conditions, since preparing for the storm becomes difficult once tropical storm-force winds begin. A tropical storm or hurricane warning means those conditions are expected in the area. Warnings are typically issued 36 hours in advance of the onset of tropical storm-force winds. When a warning is issued, you should complete all storm preparations and, if directed by local officials, evacuate the area immediately.

 

Background

Infrared Satellite

Infrared Satellite

Infrared Satellite

This infrared satellite image shows how cold (and therefore how high) the cloud tops are. Brighter orange and red shadings concentrated near the center of circulation signify a healthy tropical cyclone.

 

Background

Visible Satellite

Visible Satellite

Visible Satellite

This visible satellite image, available only during daylight hours, can depict where the center of circulation is in a developing tropical cyclone or can pick out incredible detail in a mature hurricane’s eyewall. In some cases, you can pick out the low-level circulation displaced from its parent thunderstorms when strong shearing winds aloft are in play.

 

MORE ON WEATHER.COM: Hurricanes From Space

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